REFLECTIONS ON BLACK HISTORY

 

The following are a series of columns by Thomas C. Fleming, the co-founder of the San Francisco Sun Reporter, an African American weekly newspaper. Mr. Fleming has been active, as a writer for the paper, since its inception in 1944. Mr. Fleming celebrated his 90th birthday on November 29, 1997.

 

Introduction - Why The Black Press Is Still Needed!

Column 01 - Jacksonville, Florida, 1907-16

Column 02 - Black Entertainers on Vaudeville

Column 03 - A Stowaway to New York

Column 04 - Boyhood in Harlem, 1916-19

Column 05 - Marcus Garvey Comes To Harlem

Column 06 - Encounters With Fats Waller

Column 07 - The Rise of Black Professionals

Column 08 - Mischief-Making in Harlem

Column 09 - Goodbye to New York

Column 10 - West to California

Column 11 - Black Life in Rural California

Column 12 - Race Relations In A Small California Town

Column 13 - Jim Crow in 1920s California

Column 14 - Good Times in Chico

Column 15 - The Klan Marches in California

Column 16 - The Black Press in the 1920s

Column 17 - The Day President Harding Died

Column 18 - Black Musicians and Early Radio

Column 19 - The Great Experiment

Column 20 - A Potential Race Riot

Column 21 - California's First Black Politicians

Column 22 - The Agricultural Life

Column 23 - The Color Line

Column 24 - My Mother, The Domestic 

Column 25 - A Jack of All Trades

Column 26 - Job Discrimination in the '20s

Column 27 - To The Future

Column 28 - Burned Out

Column 29 - Back to the City

Column 30 - Finding Work

Column 31 - The Admiral Line

Column 32 - On The S.S. Emma Alexander

Column 33 - Stopover in Seattle

 

Last Updated February 2, 2003

 

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