MUNIRAH CHRONICLE

                                                                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                                                       

*******   Today in Black History –  December 18, 2018  *******   

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1852 - George H. White is born in Rosindale, North Carolina. 

        He will become a lawyer, state legislator, and in 1896,

        the only African American member of the United States

        House of Representatives, where he will be the first to

        introduce an anti-lynching bill. He will also found the

        town of Whitesboro, New Jersey, as a haven for African

        Americans escaping southern racism. He will join the

        ancestors on December 28, 1918.

 

1860 - South Carolina declares itself an "independent

        commonwealth."

 

1865 - Congress proclaims the ratification of the thirteenth

        Amendment to the Constitution, abolishing slavery.  The

        ratification process had been completed on December 6,

        1865.

 

1912 - Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr. is born in Washington, DC. The

        fourth African American graduate of West Point, he will

        be one of only two African American combat officers when

        he got his first assignment out of college in 1936, the

        other being his father. In 1941, he was a part of the

        first class of graduates from the newly minted program at

        Tuskegee Army Air Field for African American pilots. He

        was also the first African American officer to solo in a

        U.S. Army Air Corps aircraft. By 1942, he will be promoted

        to the rank of lieutenant colonel and appointed commander

        of the 99th Pursuit Squadr n. He will go on to fly many

        successful missions in Europe with the 332nd Fighter group

        of which he will also take command in one of his many

        leadership roles within the Tuskegee Airmen squadrons.

        Awarded both the Silver Star and the Distinguished Flying

        Cross, he will become the first African American general in

        the Air Force. On December 9, 1998, he will be advanced to

        four-star general by President Bill Clinton. He will join

        the ancestors on July 4, 2002.

       

 

1917 - Raiford Chatman "Ossie" Davis is born in Cogdell, Georgia. 

        While he will be best known as an actor in such plays as

        "Jeb" (where he will meet his wife, Ruby Dee) and "Purlie

        Victorious" and films like "Let's Do It Again," "Do The

        Right Thing," and "Jungle Fever," he will be a playwright,

        screenwriter, and director(Cotton Comes to Harlem).  In

        1969, he will win an Emmy for his role in "Teacher,

        Teacher" and will be a featured performer in television's

        "Evening Shade." He will find recognition late in his life

        by working in several of director Spike Lee's films,

        including "Do The Right Thing," "Jungle Fever," "She Hate

        Me" and "Get on the Bus." He will also find work as a

        commercial voice-over artist and serve as the narrator of

        the early-1990s CBS sitcom "Evening Shade," starring Burt

        Reynolds, where he will also play one of the residents of a

        small southern town. In 1999, he will appear as a theater

        caretaker in the Trans-Siberian Orchestra film "The Ghosts

        of Christmas Eve," which wil be released on DVD two years

        later. For many years, he will host the annual National

        Memorial Day Concert from Washington, DC. His distinguished

        bearing will make him a perfect choice for the concert.

        His last role will be as a several episode guest role on the

        Showtime drama series "The L Word," as a father struggling

        with the acceptance of his daughter Bette (Jennifer Beals)

        parenting a child with her lesbian partner. In his final

        episodes, his character will be taken ill and die. His wife

        Ruby Dee will be present during the filming of his own death

        scene. That episode, which will air shortly after his own

        transition, airs with a dedication to the actor. He will join

        the ancestors on February 4, 2005.

 

1958 - Niger gains autonomy within the French Community of Nations.

 

1961 - Wilt Chamberlain of the NBA Philadelphia Warriors scores 78

        points vs the Los Angeles Lakers.

 

1964 - Funeral services are held in Chicago for Sam Cooke. Hundreds

        of fans will cause damage to the A.R. Leak Funeral Home,

        where Cooke's body is on display.

 

1971 - Jesse Jackson announces the formation of Operation Push

        (People United to Save Humanity), a new African American

        political and economic development organization. Jackson,

        who resigned from Operation Breadbasket, the economic arm

        of the SCLC, says, "the problems of the 1970's are economic

        so the solution and goal must be economic."

 

1971 - The NAACP's Spingarn Medal is presented to Rev. Leon H.

        Sullivan, founder of Opportunities Industrialization

        Centers of America (OIC) for his leadership.

 

1989 - Ernest Dickerson wins the New York Film Critics Circle Award

        for best cinematography for the movie "Do the Right Thing."

 

1996 - The Oakland, California School board becomes the first in

        the nation to recognize Black English, a.k.a. Ebonics, as a

        separate language, NOT a dialect or slang.

 

 

*********************************************************

The source for these facts are "Encyclopedia Britannica,

"Before the Mayflower", "Black Firsts" and independent

research by Mr. Rene’ A. Perry, Sr.

*********************************************************

 

EVERY MONTH SHOULD BE BLACK HISTORY MONTH! CHECK OUT THESE OTHER BLACK HISTORY SITES ON THE WEB

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture - located in Harlem, New York City

Black History - Black History Links from the Information Man

Black History - Afro-American Newspapers

National Civil Rights Museum - located in Memphis, Tennessee

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History  - located in Detroit, Michigan

Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture - located in Baltimore, Maryland

National Museum of African American History and Culture - located in Washington, DC

 

 

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Last Updated Tuesday, December 18, 2018